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  #1  
Old 28th April 2012, 04:59 AM
Thetargos Online
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MacBook Pro, F16 and Snow Leopard → Lion migration... HELP!

Hi all!

I've been searching the web (scarcely) for a guide on how would be for me the best way to install Fedora (16) onto my MacBook Pro (I've had it with those times that I'm at work and something's come up and I have to wait until later that night to get into my Linux workstation) coexisting (if at all possible) happily with Snow Leopard (soon to be Lion) on the same drive. Now I know that since Leopard, getting Linux installed alongside Mac OS is a tricky buisiness, plus I would rather not lose any data on the Mac drive, as it holds a LOT of personal files and other work-related applications and files that I: 1) do not have the install media for, and 2) Cannot afford to lose.

Now, I know that at least there was a way to harmlessly install Linux alongside MacOS, again, not sure if since Snow Leopard it is possible or not to resize and partition the drive non-destructively (should be possible, only dunno exactly how). Plus there is the issue that this machine is scheduled to be upgraded to Lion some time soon, as well...

My guess would be that I'd better install Fedora after the upgrade to Lion to not mess the boot loader, etc... I'm only guessing here (only experience with multiboot has been on BIOS based hardware with Windows) as I would assume the installation of Lion will alter to some degree the boot process just as it happens when you install Windows after you install Linux on a BIOS based PC, which would erase the bootloader from the MBR (I know EFI partitionned hard drives do not have an MBR), but I'm not sure with EFI on Apple hardware...

So what would be the best way for me to get this feat done? Any pointers?

Thanks in advance!
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  #2  
Old 28th April 2012, 03:54 PM
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Re: MacBook Pro, F16 and Snow Leopard → Lion migration... HELP!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thetargos View Post
I've been searching the web (scarcely) for a guide on how would be for me the best way to install Fedora (16) onto my MacBook Pro (I've had it with those times that I'm at work and something's come up and I have to wait until later that night to get into my Linux workstation) coexisting (if at all possible) happily with Snow Leopard (soon to be Lion) on the same drive. Now I know that since Leopard, getting Linux installed alongside Mac OS is a tricky buisiness,
It can be tricky, or it can be easy. It depends on your level of knowledge, the approach you take, and the specific model you've got.

Quote:
plus I would rather not lose any data on the Mac drive, as it holds a LOT of personal files and other work-related applications and files that I: 1) do not have the install media for, and 2) Cannot afford to lose.
In that case, attempt nothing unless/until you make a backup! You should never adjust a disk's partitions or install a new OS on a computer if it contains irreplaceable data that you haven't backed up! (This goes for your impending OS X 10.7 upgrade, too.)

Quote:
Now, I know that at least there was a way to harmlessly install Linux alongside MacOS, again, not sure if since Snow Leopard it is possible or not to resize and partition the drive non-destructively (should be possible, only dunno exactly how).
OS X's Disk Utility includes the ability to resize HFS+ partitions. IIRC, so does GParted, but I haven't used it for that task in a while (if ever).

Quote:
Plus there is the issue that this machine is scheduled to be upgraded to Lion some time soon, as well...
The way you've phrased this makes it sound like it's a computer that somebody else, such as your employer, owns. If so, I wouldn't suggest doing anything to it without the owner's permission. People have been fired for lesser infractions. I'll proceed under the assumption that it's either your computer or you have permission to install Linux on it.

Quote:
My guess would be that I'd better install Fedora after the upgrade to Lion to not mess the boot loader, etc...
That would be my advice, too, but it has less to do with the boot loader than with the fact that OS X's installer can be fussy about partitioning. You don't want to create a partition layout that will give you grief.

[quoote]I'm only guessing here (only experience with multiboot has been on BIOS based hardware with Windows) as I would assume the installation of Lion will alter to some degree the boot process just as it happens when you install Windows after you install Linux on a BIOS based PC, which would erase the bootloader from the MBR (I know EFI partitionned hard drives do not have an MBR), but I'm not sure with EFI on Apple hardware... [quote]

Although OS X installation could disrupt a boot manager you've installed, that problem should be easier to fix than it would be on a BIOS-based computer.

Quote:
So what would be the best way for me to get this feat done? Any pointers?
Broadly speaking, there are two ways to install Linux on a Mac:
  • In a "pure" EFI boot mode. This method uses the Mac's native EFI to boot, by installing an EFI boot loader for Linux and possibly a separate EFI boot manager to select which OS to boot. IMHO, this is the best way to do it if it works. On some Mac models, this approach can result in a blank video display or other hardware that doesn't work. My impression is that such problems are slowly going away, but you might still run into them.
  • Using the Mac's CSM, which is a type of BIOS emulation. In this mode, Linux thinks it's running on a BIOS-based computer. The problem is that this adds about 30 seconds to the Mac's startup time and it requires use of a hybrid MBR, which is an ugly hack that many users find difficult to maintain and that, if mismanaged, can endanger your data. Ironically, neither Linux nor OS X uses the MBR side of a hybrid MBR; it's only required to activate the CSM at boot time.

You may want to check out my EFI-Booting Ubuntu on a Mac Web page. Although it's written for Ubuntu, the basic procedure described there should work for Fedora. In fact, it may work better for Fedora. The reason is that Fedora doesn't use GRUB 2 for EFI booting; it uses a patched version of GRUB Legacy, which is likely to be easier to install and use. Even better, Fedora began shipping 3.3.x kernels a while ago, and those kernels include EFI stub loader support. Thus, you can have rEFInd boot your Linux kernels directly. Instead of installing the EFI version of GRUB, as described on my Web page, you'd install an EFI driver for the filesystem used on your /boot partition, edit refind.conf to uncomment the scan_all_linux_kernels option, and create a refind_linux.conf file to hold your Linux kernel options. rEFInd will then detect your kernels and boot them directly.

Another resource is Ubuntu's UEFIBooting page. Despite being hosted on an Ubuntu site, it actually applies to all Linux distributions. It's rather GRUB2-centric, but it contains a lot of valuable data. Check the table of models mid-way down the page, for instance. If you're lucky, your model will appear, which may tell you whether you can expect to get your video card to work in a native EFI boot.
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  #3  
Old 28th April 2012, 11:51 PM
Thetargos Online
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Re: MacBook Pro, F16 and Snow Leopard → Lion migration... HELP!

Thanks for the lengthy explanation. I'm gonna read a bit more about this feat.

First of all, I own the machine, I say that is scheduled to be upgraded since my employer will pay for the upgrade to OS 10.7...

At any rate, I successfully resized the drive and was able to make the Fedora DVD boot. In the first attempt, though, Anaconda wouldn't recognize the HDD (it would hang at the detection of the storage media installed on the computer). In my second attempt, and after a bit of tiral and error, I found out that I needed to create a sorts of EFI partition for Fedora (the BIOS boot partition) so Anaconda wouldn't complain about not setting up a Stage 1 bootstrap partition. Up to that point everything was OK, until the actual installation process, which sort of starts, because it complaints about not being able to find a package, even though the installation media test was OK, and when I burnt the DVD (I use an RW disk so I don't end up with a ton of useless disks) the burning process tested the media just burnt to be OK.

So I'm at my attempt number three, and I do miss the ability to install from USB media, as it is both faster and very convenient on BIOS-based hardware (AFAIK the USB boot limitation is an Apple's restriction to their EFI). If this attempt is not successful, I'll try to locate an installation guide...

I do wonder, however, what other consumer products use EFI other than the few hybrid motherboards from Gigabyte, Asus, some others and Macs?
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  #4  
Old 29th April 2012, 02:21 AM
srs5694 Offline
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Re: MacBook Pro, F16 and Snow Leopard → Lion migration... HELP!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thetargos View Post
after a bit of tiral and error, I found out that I needed to create a sorts of EFI partition for Fedora (the BIOS boot partition) so Anaconda wouldn't complain about not setting up a Stage 1 bootstrap partition.
This implies you're installing in BIOS mode. You might have better luck in EFI mode, but controlling which mode boots can be tricky. rEFIt or rEFInd can help on that score (especially rEFInd, since it's got better configuration options). I'm not saying you should try this right away, though; if you can get it installed in BIOS mode, you can switch boot modes later.

Quote:
Up to that point everything was OK, until the actual installation process, which sort of starts, because it complaints about not being able to find a package, even though the installation media test was OK, and when I burnt the DVD (I use an RW disk so I don't end up with a ton of useless disks) the burning process tested the media just burnt to be OK.
It might be trying to download something from the Internet and running into network problems. Be sure you've got a reliable Internet connection -- use an Ethernet cable rather than rely on wi-fi, for instance.

Quote:
So I'm at my attempt number three, and I do miss the ability to install from USB media, as it is both faster and very convenient on BIOS-based hardware (AFAIK the USB boot limitation is an Apple's restriction to their EFI). If this attempt is not successful, I'll try to locate an installation guide...
I was able to boot my Mac Mini in BIOS mode from a USB flash drive by using rEFInd. Thus, you could try that (or rEFIt; for this purpose it'll probably work just like rEFInd). Of course, this will only help if your DVD drive is being flaky. If you're running into problems with another cause, switching the installation medium won't help.

Quote:
I do wonder, however, what other consumer products use EFI other than the few hybrid motherboards from Gigabyte, Asus, some others and Macs?
Most new computers use EFI (or its version-2.0 variant, UEFI). Even most computers that aren't advertised as supporting EFI do. Most (in fact, all, AFAIK) PCs still support booting in BIOS mode, but EFI support is now close to being standard. Unfortunately, many of the EFI implementations are lacking in configurability, and many also have bugs. I expect things to stabilize a bit in the next year or so, though, as improved EFI implementations make their way into the market.
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Old 29th April 2012, 05:19 PM
Thetargos Online
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Re: MacBook Pro, F16 and Snow Leopard → Lion migration... HELP!

Quote:
Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
This implies you're installing in BIOS mode. You might have better luck in EFI mode, but controlling which mode boots can be tricky. rEFIt or rEFInd can help on that score (especially rEFInd, since it's got better configuration options). I'm not saying you should try this right away, though; if you can get it installed in BIOS mode, you can switch boot modes later.
Since I use a custom partitioning for all my Linux boxes, I tried to follow the same... I did notice that the special partition Anaconda was complaining about should be the one of type "BIOS boot"... Is there a way to custom produce an EFI partition for Fedora formatted in vfat but to tell Anaconda that it is actually the Fedora EFI partition?

Quote:
Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
It might be trying to download something from the Internet and running into network problems. Be sure you've got a reliable Internet connection -- use an Ethernet cable rather than rely on wi-fi, for instance.
I discovered that it may have something to do with the media itself, after all. I started the installation process on my main rig (x86_64 Athlon X2 based PC) and performed the media check which did not pass... Or one of the DVD uinits is acting up. In which case I could still create an USB install media from the x86_64 Fedora image... That was how I ended up installing Fedora 16 onto my HP Mini netbook.



Quote:
Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
I was able to boot my Mac Mini in BIOS mode from a USB flash drive by using rEFInd. Thus, you could try that (or rEFIt; for this purpose it'll probably work just like rEFInd). Of course, this will only help if your DVD drive is being flaky. If you're running into problems with another cause, switching the installation medium won't help.
I will have to explore these EFI utilities...



Quote:
Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
Most new computers use EFI (or its version-2.0 variant, UEFI). Even most computers that aren't advertised as supporting EFI do. Most (in fact, all, AFAIK) PCs still support booting in BIOS mode, but EFI support is now close to being standard. Unfortunately, many of the EFI implementations are lacking in configurability, and many also have bugs. I expect things to stabilize a bit in the next year or so, though, as improved EFI implementations make their way into the market.
Interesting... from what I gather EFI boot requires the presence of the GPT EFI partition on the drive, or media so a fresh install of any OS booting from EFI should create this partition at some point during installation, correct?
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  #6  
Old 29th April 2012, 06:09 PM
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Re: MacBook Pro, F16 and Snow Leopard → Lion migration... HELP!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thetargos View Post
Since I use a custom partitioning for all my Linux boxes, I tried to follow the same... I did notice that the special partition Anaconda was complaining about should be the one of type "BIOS boot"... Is there a way to custom produce an EFI partition for Fedora formatted in vfat but to tell Anaconda that it is actually the Fedora EFI partition?
It's not clear what you mean by this, probably because of some confusion over terminology, so here are some key definitions:
  • Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) -- This is the firmware used by Macs. It provides boot services to get an OS running and runtime services to handle a few tasks (such as shutdown) once the OS is running. A variant is Unified EFI (UEFI), which is essentially EFI 2.x. Macs and some older systems use EFI 1.x, but most new PCs use UEFI.
  • GUID Partition Table (GPT) -- This is a partition table type used on most EFI-based computers and also on some BIOS-based computers. Note that an entire disk uses GPT. GPT is the successor to the older Master Boot Record (MBR), which has been used on most PCs for three decades, and to Apple Partition Map (APM), which Apple used on its 680x0 and PowerPC systems.
  • EFI System Partition (ESP) -- This is a specific type of partition that holds EFI boot loader code, EFI drivers, etc. The ESP normally uses FAT32. On most EFI computers, the ESP is required and must hold at least one boot loader in order for the computer to boot. The Mac's EFI is a bit weird, though, and Macs can boot with an empty ESP or even with no ESP at all. Normally, any given disk has precisely one ESP, and it's not really associated with any one OS. Depending on how you look at it, it's "owned" by the EFI (but managed from one or more OSes) or it's "owned" jointly by all the installed OSes. It is legal to have a disk with multiple ESPs, but this is rare.
  • BIOS Boot Partition -- This is a partition type that's used by GRUB 2 on BIOS-based computers to hold boot code on GPT disks. The BIOS Boot Partition doesn't use a filesystem; it's "raw" code. There will normally be just one BIOS Boot Partition per GPT disk. In principle there could be more than one, but given the way BIOS and GRUB boot, managing more than one could get complex and confusing.

When you boot a Linux installer in BIOS mode and tell it to install on a GPT disk, it will probably use any BIOS Boot Partition that's present or create a new one, at least if the OS installer tries to install GRUB 2 as the boot loader. It's unlikely that you'll be able to create a distribution-specific BIOS Boot Partition. I don't recall if Fedora has any particular quirks in terms of its BIOS Boot Partition support.

When you boot a Linux installer in EFI mode, it should install a boot loader in the ESP. If no ESP is present, the installer should create one. Since the ESP is shared across all OSes, the installer should just use a distribution-specific directory on the ESP to store its boot loader (and possibly its Linux kernels, although Fedora doesn't do this by default).

Quote:
Interesting... from what I gather EFI boot requires the presence of the GPT EFI partition on the drive, or media so a fresh install of any OS booting from EFI should create this partition at some point during installation, correct?
Yes, except that the Mac's EFI can boot without using the ESP. Unlike most EFI implementations, the Mac's EFI understands HFS+, and it boots in an odd way that enables it to read an EFI boot loader from the Mac OS system partition, as /System/Library/CoreServices/boot.efi. To dual-boot OS X and any other OS, you've got to install another utility as the normal boot program (via the "bless" program in OS X) or rely on the Mac's multi-boot capabilities by holding down the Option key (or the Alt key using a PC keyboard) at boot time to select another boot option.
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Old 29th April 2012, 07:17 PM
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Re: MacBook Pro, F16 and Snow Leopard → Lion migration... HELP!

Quote:
Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
When you boot a Linux installer in BIOS mode and tell it to install on a GPT disk, it will probably use any BIOS Boot Partition that's present or create a new one, at least if the OS installer tries to install GRUB 2 as the boot loader. It's unlikely that you'll be able to create a distribution-specific BIOS Boot Partition. I don't recall if Fedora has any particular quirks in terms of its BIOS Boot Partition support.

When you boot a Linux installer in EFI mode, it should install a boot loader in the ESP. If no ESP is present, the installer should create one. Since the ESP is shared across all OSes, the installer should just use a distribution-specific directory on the ESP to store its boot loader (and possibly its Linux kernels, although Fedora doesn't do this by default).
That much I understand, maybe I did not make myself clear in my last post, sorry. Now, how would I launch Anaconda (specifically speaking of Fedora) in EFI mode? That is what I do not understand, or been able to find any information about (I thought that when asking the Mac to boot from the optic media drive, it'd select the best boot mode for the media present), however with the disk present in the drive and booting with the option key pressed instead of the 'C' key, I do see two disk icons to boot from. Is one for BIOS (labeled Windows) and the other for EFI?


Quote:
Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
Yes, except that the Mac's EFI can boot without using the ESP. Unlike most EFI implementations, the Mac's EFI understands HFS+, and it boots in an odd way that enables it to read an EFI boot loader from the Mac OS system partition, as /System/Library/CoreServices/boot.efi. To dual-boot OS X and any other OS, you've got to install another utility as the normal boot program (via the "bless" program in OS X) or rely on the Mac's multi-boot capabilities by holding down the Option key (or the Alt key using a PC keyboard) at boot time to select another boot option.
Again, I'm not surprised at how Apple managed to get this done. On my machine, I do have an EFI vfat formatted partition (checked with parted during installation from Fedora, before partitioning the disk). However this does not answer my question, why would I need additional tools if Fedora boots either in BIOS or EFI mode, when all apparent infrastructure is present both in the install media and the HDD? (reading about rEFIt and rEFInd as I type this)

---------- Post added at 01:17 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:03 PM ----------

Duh! I see what those are, EFI boot managers, a la GRUB or LiLO or Windows Boot Manager. Nice. Still doesn't help much with the boot of the installation media... Will keep reading... In the mean time, as rEFInd seems to be rEFIt reloaded and improved, I downloaded that.
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Old 29th April 2012, 07:36 PM
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Re: MacBook Pro, F16 and Snow Leopard → Lion migration... HELP!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thetargos View Post
That much I understand, maybe I did not make myself clear in my last post, sorry. Now, how would I launch Anaconda (specifically speaking of Fedora) in EFI mode? That is what I do not understand, or been able to find any information about (I thought that when asking the Mac to boot from the optic media drive, it'd select the best boot mode for the media present), however with the disk present in the drive and booting with the option key pressed instead of the 'C' key, I do see two disk icons to boot from. Is one for BIOS (labeled Windows) and the other for EFI?
Chances are one of them boots in BIOS mode and another in EFI mode, as you've surmised; however, I can't promise that, and I can't help you distinguish one from the other. You can check the boot mode after it's booted as described here. (Basically, if /sys/firmware/efi is present, you've booted in EFI mode; if not, you've probably booted in BIOS mode.)

To control the boot mode is an area where EFI vendors, including Apple, have largely fallen down. Some provide no options whatsoever; you get what you get, and if you need something else, you've got to really know what you're doing. Others offer boot-time options, but they're usually poorly identified (as in the two disk icons you're seeing).

Quote:
On my machine, I do have an EFI vfat formatted partition (checked with parted during installation from Fedora, before partitioning the disk). However this does not answer my question, why would I need additional tools if Fedora boots either in BIOS or EFI mode, when all apparent infrastructure is present both in the install media and the HDD? (reading about rEFIt and rEFInd as I type this)
I think your first question answers your second: You need (or at least, can benefit from) tools such as rEFIt and (especially) rEFInd because they provide you with better control over BIOS vs. EFI booting. In rEFInd, you can set the "scanfor" option in its refind.conf configuration file to tell the program to scan for any of seven different types of boot loader definitions. If you want to be sure you boot in EFI mode, for instance, you can omit the three BIOS-mode boot definitions. Anything that remains in the boot list is then guaranteed to be an EFI-mode boot loader.

In the long run, rEFIt and rEFInd provide a boot menu for everyday use that's more convenient and flexible than what Apple provides. Substitute "Gigabyte," "HP," "Intel," or other PC manufacturers for "Apple" and the statement is equally true, if not more so. To be sure, you can boot without such a program, and this is fine in many simple configurations, such as a single-OS computer. When multi-booting, though, most EFI implementations provide such poor boot managers that they're essentially useless. Apple's is better than most, but still not that great.

---------- Post added at 02:36 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:27 PM ----------

The following came in after I began my previous reply....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thetargos View Post
Duh! I see what those are, EFI boot managers, a la GRUB or LiLO or Windows Boot Manager. Nice. Still doesn't help much with the boot of the installation media... Will keep reading... In the mean time, as rEFInd seems to be rEFIt reloaded and improved, I downloaded that.
rEFIt and rEFInd can both scan and redirect the boot process to external boot media, including USB flash drives and optical discs. It's in this way that they can be helpful in getting a Fedora installation started in the way you want. rEFInd is much more flexible on this score than is rEFIt. See the rEFInd documentation's page on its configuration file, and in particular the "scanfor" item in Table 1. The default configuration scans for EFI boot loaders on internal hard disks, external hard disks, and optical discs. This will exclude BIOS-bootable media from the rEFInd boot menu. If you want to install Fedora in EFI mode, this is one way to ensure you boot the installer appropriately. OTOH, if you wanted to install Fedora in BIOS mode, you could do so by removing "optical" from the "scanfor" line and adding in "cd" (assuming you're installing from an optical disc).
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Old 29th April 2012, 08:50 PM
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Re: MacBook Pro, F16 and Snow Leopard → Lion migration... HELP!

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Originally Posted by Thetargos View Post
So what would be the best way for me to get this feat done? Any pointers?
Your smolt URLs fail 2 for 3, including the MBP so I can't tell exactly which MBP you have. I'm looking for Model Identifier in System Profiler or type:
Code:
system_profiler | grep 'Model Identifier'
and paste results.
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Old 29th April 2012, 09:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrismurphy View Post
Your smolt URLs fail 2 for 3, including the MBP so I can't tell exactly which MBP you have. I'm looking for Model Identifier in System Profiler or type:
Code:
system_profiler | grep 'Model Identifier'
and paste results.
I'm away from the computer right now, but it is a MacBook Pro 7,1 specifics include Intel Core 2 Duo 2.4 GHz, 4 GB of RAM, Broadcom network interfaces (both gigabit ethernet and wireless), nVidia 320M Graphics and nVidia chipset.

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Old 29th April 2012, 09:58 PM
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Re: MacBook Pro, F16 and Snow Leopard → Lion migration... HELP!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thetargos View Post
I'm away from the computer right now, but it is a MacBook Pro 7,1 specifics include Intel Core 2 Duo 2.4 GHz, 4 GB of RAM, Broadcom network interfaces (both gigabit ethernet and wireless), nVidia 320M Graphics and nVidia chipset.
Sent on the move
This bug might apply, and if so would be an issue booting Live-Desktop media since you can't change its kernel.
https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=650949

Also, there are many significant changes occurring in F17 that may make EFI booting Macs a much more consistent possibility than it is right now. I have a MBP4,1 and 8,2 and neither can successfully complete EFI boot and startup with F16, I have to use CSM-BIOS mode booting. In fact much of the time GRUB Legacy EFI just results in corruption, kernel panics, or reboots so I totally gave up on it for F16.

With F17 final TC2, I can fully EFI boot the MBP4,1 for the first time ever with nouveau, and x. But does not work along side Mac OS dual boot yet. And on the MBP8,2 I get a hidden panic or other halt from install media. Significant progress is being made, but we'll have to see how it plays out in the end because the changes are very different from any other distro.

Since it's all very model specific, you have to try a lot of things to have a change of it working, or just get lucky. The matrix is kinda complex. e.g. USB stick media is only workable for EFI boot because Apple's CSM-BIOS implementation apparently doesn't boot off USB media. So your best bet may be the DVD ISO burned onto an actual disk, and boot with the option key at the startup chime.

And the disk selection menu "Windows" means CSM-BIOS boot. "EFI Boot" means just that.

Last edited by chrismurphy; 30th April 2012 at 12:05 AM. Reason: fix typos
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Old 30th April 2012, 02:31 AM
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So, chrismurphy, what would you advise, should I proceed with a CS M-BIOS installation of F16, our should I attempt EFI with F17?

I think I stumbled into the bug you referenced during the install procedure, as Anaconda complained about a critical error while installing the kernel from the DVD media, booting in EFI mode. At least this time I got that far.

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Last edited by Thetargos; 30th April 2012 at 02:42 AM.
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Old 30th April 2012, 02:44 AM
chrismurphy Offline
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Re: MacBook Pro, F16 and Snow Leopard → Lion migration... HELP!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thetargos View Post
So, chrismurphy, what would you advise, should I proceed with a CMS-BIOS installation of F16, our should I attempt EFI with F17?
I can't exactly advise you use F17 because it's not final yet, so you'd be testing. And while there are always bugs, there are bugs and incomplete features in F17 and no documentation. So that's kinda up to you.

Quote:
I think I stumbled into the bug you referenced during the install procedure, as Anaconda complained about a critical error while installing the kernel from the DVD media, booting in EFI mode. At least this time I got that far.
I'm not aware of a bug during installation. If you got far enough with EFI boot of the DVD to see the installer environments, that's pretty good. What you could do is try that again and choose the update repo so that the installer downloads the latest kernel (and other software) instead of installing what's on the DVD.

Note, that the installer will not do post installation work necessary for you to get a boot option for Fedora by default. It may be easiest to use rEFInd which I think will find grub.efi on the EFI partition, and then you'll end up at a GRUB menu and hopefully able to boot.

---------- Post added at 07:44 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:40 PM ----------

And if you do try F17, like I mentioned, while I can boot it when it's the only OS on the laptop, I can't in a dual boot installation. That bit of post install isn't done yet.
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Old 30th April 2012, 02:45 AM
Thetargos Online
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Will try that, thanks.

Sent on the move
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Old 2nd May 2012, 02:58 AM
Thetargos Online
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Re: MacBook Pro, F16 and Snow Leopard → Lion migration... HELP!

I'm at it again...

I did not have time during the weekend and it was until tonight that I got back at attempting to install Fedora 16 onto my MBP 7,1

Progress so far:

  • Booting in EFI mode the DVD media gets me up to the actual installation process.
  • I am able to partition the disk and format the partitions.
  • I am also able to bring up the wired connection to attempt an "updated" installation (selected both Fedora-16-x86_64 and Fedora-Updates-16-x86_64 repos).
  • At installation start up Anaconda complaints about quite a few "missing packages" and offers me a window with a Reboot and Eject buttons... ironically hitting 'eject' will cause Anaconda to look for the packages another time. I have to click several times the button before Anaconda would actually spin up the disk and "find" the package, until the next one "fails" (**it would appear as if I had to let the disk actually spin-down for Anaconda to actually locate it on the disk)

That's where I'm at at the moment... Trying to get past libplist-1.3.2-fc15-x86_64.rpm :-/

I hope this time aroudn the install process will actually finish... Will post back at any rate, be sure of that.

The installation is going to take a while as it is going to download a whole load of packages...

---------- Post added at 08:58 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:22 PM ----------

Half-way into the installation of the first couple of packages the installation complained about not being able to locate files on the DVD, and aborted, restarted in BIOS mode and thus far is around 350 packages into the installation (default settings, and package selection, about 1240 packages), still downloading all errata packages, though.
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Last edited by Thetargos; 2nd May 2012 at 02:24 AM. Reason: Found some strange behavior.
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