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  #1  
Old 12th June 2006, 08:41 PM
tashirosgt Offline
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How do hydraulic jacks come apart?

Anyone know a web page that tells how to disassemble or rebuild small hydraulic jacks? (That's a non-linux related question, isn't it? )

I have two hydraulic "bottle jacks" that don't work. One is from a Sears 3.5 ton floor jack. It looks to be about a 12 Ton jack and its only marking is "MVP". A valve in it must leak because a load that is jacked up will slowly descend. The other jack is a 12 ton jack from a shop press. It will jack things up, but when the valve is released, it does not descend unless there is a very large load on it. Although I'm not promising to repair these bottle jacks, I would like to know how to take them apart. For example, does the cylinder unscrew from the metal base?
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  #2  
Old 13th June 2006, 02:20 AM
Linux The Great Offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tashirosgt
Anyone know a web page that tells how to disassemble or rebuild small hydraulic jacks?
Try this website: http://www.google.com/linux

I know I'm a smug bastard.... but I just couldn't help myself.
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  #3  
Old 13th June 2006, 11:16 AM
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Hmm, a little harsh.

Im afraid i know very little about machinery. However i do know that many jacks in the UK have a small cylinder inside a sealed metal case and that cylinder contains the jack press and the fluid needed to keep it up and let it down. As for how to get into it, i saw a jack once and they are sealed up and weilded shut. That MVP is a manufactureers stampt. Google it and then you can trace your product. It then can help in a search for how to service them. If you just want to play, grab cutting tools and hack it away!!

Hope that helps,

MAniX
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  #4  
Old 13th June 2006, 12:33 PM
bob Online
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Suggestion: the small jacks are only about $25.00 to $50.00 . Before I'd trust my life or equipment to a faulty one or waste time and face the mess of fixing one, I'd replace it.
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  #5  
Old 13th June 2006, 02:29 PM
tashirosgt Offline
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But wasting time trying to fix things is the whole purpose of having tools. I think it might be the whole purpose of fooling with computers too. Besides, I said that I didn't promise to fix them - I only promised to take them apart. I followed a similar procedure with clocks, when I was a kid.
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  #6  
Old 13th June 2006, 08:40 PM
sailor Offline
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LOL...I used to take things a part when I was a kid...I even managed to fix a few things
Now, I would rather let someone else do it...

http://www.hyjacks.com/H7.HTM has a little info on jacks...
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  #7  
Old 13th June 2006, 09:41 PM
tashirosgt Offline
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That is a great link. The exploded diagram of the Yasui jack shows the top of the cylinder unscrews (makes sense since it has a bix hex nut on it) and the cylinder wall may unscrew from the base also. The pages also warn you not to try to fill up the jack through the valves and and give plausible locations for the fill hole. And there is a discussion of what to use for hydraulic fluid. (I was wondering why I didn't see any cans marked "hydraulic jack oil" in the autoparts stores.)
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  #8  
Old 13th June 2006, 11:06 PM
EngineerJoe Offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MAnix
If you just want to play, grab cutting tools and hack it away!!
Please don't. Pressurized fluid is never something you want to take a sawzall or hacksaw too. And considering that the inner casing may be hardened steel, you'd be wasting your time and/or going through a lot of tools.
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  #9  
Old 14th June 2006, 04:29 AM
w5set Offline
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actually most of them come apart with the top "nut" part at the center of the jack.
then just take apart the valve assembly and check the spring and matching "check ball/or needle" and make sure the holes leading into and out of this area are clean ---usually a little rusty/dirty in this areas.
That's the leading cause of slow decent when supposed to stay up (leaking down) or staying up and not coming down. (hydraulic oil will get moisture out of the air itself).
If the jack is leaking down because of external leakage--it will show at the top of the jack cylinder as just that and that means a seal replacement and as Bob put it--a usually good import is $20 to $50 for a SAFE way to get a good jack to trust.
Usually the problem is within though as rust/scale/dirt buildup in the valve area, which is usually easily cleaned.
The signs of external leakage--especially at the top---is sign for throwing it in the recycle bin and getting another as a lot of old jacks have superceeded seals and are no longer available.
Hydraulic jack oil is readily available at most major auto parts suppliers or your local farm and home supply store. Don't substitute any other oil for it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! If any doubt as to safety of the jack--smash it with a hammer and don't just sell it at your next yard sale--a friend may buy it----recycle it into an new toyota--etc...don't trust your life by getting under a vehicle using a doubtful one.
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  #10  
Old 14th June 2006, 05:19 AM
EngineerJoe Offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by w5set
(hydraulic oil will get moisture out of the air itself).
Hydraulic fluid is hydroscopic (absorbs water over time). What a lot of people don't know is that this property also applies to the brake fluid in your vehicle. A lot of experts will advise a complete change of your brake fluid once every two years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by w5set
don't trust your life by getting under a vehicle using a doubtful one.
Good advice. When I would work on cars growing up, I was always told to never get under a vehicle being held by only a hydraulic jack. Jack stands are the safest way to go.
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  #11  
Old 15th June 2006, 04:19 AM
w5set Offline
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Actually "hygroscopic" is a rather big 25 cent mechanical type word to use in a computer forum so I just used "absorbs water out of the air" terminology. As do most petroleum based fluids., some readily some not so much.
And yeah--those old brake fluids from several years back used to pit the dickens out of the master cylinders and the brake cylinders. I grew up having to learn how to hone everything from brake cylinders to engine cylinders for rebuild. The newer fluids seem more resistant to moisture--or maybe it's better metals now.
I seem to have read somewhere that diesel fuel would absorb about 7% or 8% moisture and I have seen it almost cloudy/milky with moisture in it.
But an old rusty jack should probably be replaced.
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  #12  
Old 24th June 2006, 07:49 PM
sthompson102 Offline
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most jacks are welded shut and connot be serviced
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  #13  
Old 3rd July 2006, 02:16 AM
tashirosgt Offline
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I got around to fooling with the red 12 ton "Made in China" jack that used to be in my shop press. I popped out the fill button and emptied out the oil. On the top of the jack is a big hex nut about 2 1/8 inches across. I have no socket that big. But it happens that in one of my trips to Sweet Old Bob's Antiques, I purchased a large wrench. I have no idea what this wrench is for. It isn't really an antique. It has a 1" diameter round, solid steel shaft with slight bends in it. One one end is a box wrench for 2 inch nuts and on the other end is a box wrench for 2 1/4 inch nuts. The overall lenth of this thing is about 51 inches and the box wrenches are have very thick sides. The handle has a slight bend near each end. It's very embarassing for a tool collector to actually use a tool for something, but the larger wrench more or less fit the nut on the jack. I put the jack on a heavy wooden work table and used deck screws and the power screw gun to clamp the base of the jack to the table with scraps of 2x6 lumber. Then I took the wrench and had a go at removing the nut. It came off quite easily - relative to the size of wrench being used. The nut and the cast part of the top that it is a part of come off together with the piston. The only seal at the top is a thin plastic ring about the size of a piston ring. The seal at the bottom of the piston is a tough plastic or rubber washer. I don't understand how it is held on the piston yet. It appears as if the washer might be pressed on the end of the piston. I noticed the seam where the outer casing of the jack meets the base. The paint had cracked there along a line, so I thought the outer casing might also come off. I got a (modern) pipe wrench about 20 inches long and gripped the casing. It also twisted off easily. It wasn't threaded. Apparently the pressure of the nut at the top holds it to the base.
The inside of the jack is clean and not rusted. I can see that there is alot of resistance between the piston and the cylinder walls when I push it down by hand. The problem with this jack is that it did not go down easily when the valve was opened. I can't see much of the valves even with this much of the jack taken apart. The link on jacks warned against unscrewing the valve, but I think this is the only thing left to do. Either the valve must be bad ( it has a rubbery feel to it as you turn it) or the seal on the bottom of the piston is just mis-designed.
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Last edited by tashirosgt; 3rd July 2006 at 02:19 AM.
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  #14  
Old 17th December 2006, 11:47 AM
vjpca Offline
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Smile Yasui 1 1/2 - 2 T Floor jacks

Thank you for the link www.hyjacks.com. The diagram of the Yasui 1 1/2 - 2 T floor jack is very helpful. I am trying to use it for my MVP, 3T, super lift jack repair. My first problem is that I need more detail on the power piston (items 7 thru 41). A list of these parts would also be very helpful. My second problem is that I had to take the unit apart to replace the piston U seal and to flush it out properly, I took all the valves apart too. Bottom line - it doesn't work anymore. Suspect I may have not put the vaves back together properly and/or adjusted properly. There were also a couple of screen filters in the fluid reserve/piston area that were loose. Right or wrong, I stuck them in a couple of the small holes nearby.
Any expertise out there with proper assembly and possible detail diagram? It would be nice to repair this jack as it has very nice features and still looks new.
Please email helpful reply to vjpca@yahoo.com. No junk mail please.
Kindest Regards, Vince
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  #15  
Old 26th December 2006, 05:05 PM
JBSPD Offline
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Hydraulic Jack oil replacement

Hey Everyone,
I caught your discussion on hydraulic jack repair & I had question I hoped someone could answer. Its probably a "basic concept" but I've made a hell of oily mess with limited success. How do you properly fill a hydraulic floor jack. Its an older 2 1/2 ton roller jack that has kind of lost some of its ummph. It has a little leakage, but I just want to know how to fill it. I've taken out the stopper and tried filling it with ram up, that didn"t work, so I tried fillen it with ram down - still the same. It'll only jack 1/3 - 1/2 of what it should. Any help would be great. JBSPD
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