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  #1  
Old 27th March 2008, 05:19 AM
daccs Offline
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Question how to install .tar.bz2 files

I've downloaded and (thru much research and effort) uncompressed a ".tar.bz2" file in Fedora8. When I used the "tar -xjf" command to extract the file, I logged in as admin (su) and changed to the newly created directory. Only two directories were displayed ("bin" and "share"), no additional files. Not knowing how to install this file, I attempted extensive research online to (hopefully) find answers. Every resource I read that came close to helping me install this "tar" file stated that three actions must take place to install the applet; change to the newly created directory and type the "./configure" command (every time I tried this I got an unsuccesful result - got the message "bash: ./configure: No such file or directory"! The next step was to type the "Make" command (which, when I did got the message "No targets specified and no makefile found. Stop."! The third (and final) step stated to be "root" (which, as stated earlier, I was) and type the "make install"; got the message "make: *** No rule to make target `install'. Stop."!!
Please help provide me with information to properly install a ".tar.bz2" file. (the tarball file I'm attempting to install is "FileZilla".
Thanx in advance...
~ed~
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  #2  
Old 27th March 2008, 05:34 AM
scottro Offline
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That's not a typical tarball. I'm not sure what you'd do with it. I note that they suggest using a package for your distribution (I don't know if there are rpms for it or not, though no doubt, someone's made it) or else downloading the source tarball, which will have src as part of its name.

Looking at that tarball, it has an INSTALL file once it's unpacked. (It's a bz2 file which means you would do tar jxvf rather than zxvf). After that, look at the install file, with
less INSTALL

Hopefully, the steps will work if you have the necessary programs installed.
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  #3  
Old 27th March 2008, 06:37 AM
daccs Offline
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I failed to mention that I did try to locate the package manager to attempt to install the file. I am new to Linux and did not know how to use the package manager for this purpose. I tried your suggestion (use "tar -jxvf") but could not locate the INSTALL file after unpacking. Where would it be located??

Last edited by daccs; 27th March 2008 at 06:39 AM. Reason: word missing
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  #4  
Old 27th March 2008, 10:43 AM
scottro Offline
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Heh, you missed part of my suggestion. I said download the source tarball rather than the one you apparently downloaded.
Quick explanation here, as it can be confusing. There are various methods of compression, including gzip and bzip2. Files that are bzip2 compressed have a suffix of bz2 rather than gz. The bz2 files are decompressed with that j instead of z. (I have a general explanation of tarballs at http://home.nyc.rr.com/computertaijutsu/tarball.html

Using the package manager--I don't use the graphic one but you could do, from the terminal
yum search filezilla
It'll do some stuff that will take awhile, and either find something or return something like no matches found.
Don't worry, all this stuff will become second nature to you, sooner than you think. Right now, it probably seems like a lot.

To make it even more confusing, Fedora (and some other newcomer friendly distros) don't come with all the packages to compile source code by default. You might have to install the development tools.

Filezilla might not be the best place to start, as it looks as if it has a few more dependencies than some packages.

Doing yum search filezilla shows that there is an rpm for it, so you're in luck.
You can just type
yum -y install filezilla

You can look at man page for yum by doing man yum.
Man pages can be difficult at first, especially in Linux which has some of the worst man pages of all the Unixlike systems, but as you get used to them, they're helpful. The yum page is pretty clear about some things. At any rate, the -y means yes. If you don't use it, it will gather the information ask you if it's OK and then wait for your answer. (This can be handy sometimes--you might want to install some small package and see that it has 50 other packages that it's going to install as well.)

So, although it's important to learn how to work with source tarballs, in this case, I think I'd advise installing it from the rpm. Actually, if an rpm is available, you always want to use it.

The reason for this is that then the system will do the work for you, checking for updates and making necessary adjustments. If you don't use an rpm, then you'll have to do that yourself.

For example, although there's a madwifi (for wireless drivers) rpm, it doesn't work with my wireless card. I have to use a different version, from the MadWifi people's source code. Because it's not an rpm, the system doesn't keep track of it. Therefore, each time I update my kernel, I have to recompile it.

I'm throwing lots of information at you here, don't let it overwhelm you. We old folks tend to give TOO much information.
Anyway, the really short simple answer to your problem of wanting to install filezilla is to use the rpm with the command, as root
yum -y install filezilla
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  #5  
Old 27th March 2008, 03:38 PM
daccs Offline
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Scottro, thanx for your interest, info and support!

I performed the command “yum search filezilla” as the root in the “/root” directory and (after a brief period) got the following:
filezilla.i386 : FileZilla FTP, FTPS and SFTP client
filezilla.i386 : FileZilla FTP, FTPS and SFTP client

How could I have determined from the above output that there is an “rpm” for it? (I'm trying to quickly learn this environment.) BTW, I did download the source code, as well, during my earlier downloading session. Thanx for the info...

Your information was RIGHT ON!!! It worked perfectly! Thanx (again) soooo much! I appreciate (and would like to thank you for) your detailed explanations! I will visit the website you provided (regarding tarballs) to better educate myself on this command.

I do have a few more questions, (one generated from your recent response):
1 – how do you compile (or re-compile) source code in Linux?
2 – i wanted to download a manual for an applet that was (supposedly) on-line, but could not locate where to download it from (once i got to the website). The complete documentation could be accessed and read on-line, but i could not download a copy for my viewing off-line. This has happened with several other applets' user manuals. How can i download linux applet user manuals?
3 – i often use the “add/remove software” menu selection to add/remove (and sometimes) update my applets. The repository has only a version 2 of an installed applet available, but when i visited the applet's website, a version (downloadable) 3 existed (another tarball download). How can i update to the latest version?
4 – lastly, could you recommend a path (i.e., a learning process) that could assist me in the direction of experts, such as yourself, in educating myself with the linux o/s? I would classify myself as an “advanced” beginner or “initial” intermediate experienced computer/programming user.

Thanx...
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  #6  
Old 27th March 2008, 03:43 PM
Wayne
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This is not a 'Guide or Howto Article' Moved to 'General Support'

Wayne
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  #7  
Old 27th March 2008, 05:25 PM
scottro Offline
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Me no guru.
Doing an online search for the downloadable Rute book might be a start. What usually happens is that there's a massive learning curve, then you get to a point where at least you know where and how to look for things.

As for compiling source code, that link I gave earlier gives a quick run through.

As for downloading something that only seems to be viewable online, this depends--sometimes they make it that way deliberately, other times, you can (in the opera web browser, not sure how to do it in firefox) right click and choose save link as and it will download the file.

As Wayne said, it's not really a howto. One small suggestion though, confine your questions to one subject at a time. Then, all the gurus, including those who are far more knowledgeable than I am, will be more likely to answer questions.
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  #8  
Old 28th March 2008, 01:41 AM
daccs Offline
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Thanx, guys!

I'm new to this forum process (this was my very first entry). Didn't know the procedures (of course, this is no excuse). I certainly accept and will take your advice...

~daccs~
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  #9  
Old 28th March 2008, 06:29 PM
Jongi Offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daccs
Scottro, thanx for your interest, info and support!

I performed the command “yum search filezilla” as the root in the “/root” directory and (after a brief period) got the following:
filezilla.i386 : FileZilla FTP, FTPS and SFTP client
filezilla.i386 : FileZilla FTP, FTPS and SFTP client

How could I have determined from the above output that there is an “rpm” for it? (I'm trying to quickly learn this environment.) BTW, I did download the source code, as well, during my earlier downloading session. Thanx for the info...
using yum search will list those programs that are available for installation using yum. That then means that they are in fact rpms.
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  #10  
Old 28th March 2008, 06:40 PM
Jongi Offline
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If you wanted to install the tar.bz2 file, lets assume you downloaded FileZilla_3.0.8.1_i586-linux-gnu.tar.bz2 to your home directory. As a normal user you would then do the below:

Code:
$ cd ~
$ mkdir programs
$ mv FileZilla_3.0.8.1_i586-linux-gnu.tar.bz2 programs/
$ cd programs
$ tar xvf FileZilla_3.0.8.1_i586-linux-gnu.tar.bz2
$ rm FileZilla_3.0.8.1_i586-linux-gnu.tar.bz2
$ cd FileZilla3
$ cd bin
$ ./filezilla
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  #11  
Old 4th April 2008, 01:22 PM
daccs Offline
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Thanx, for the info Jongi! I will try your suggestion.

I'm new to this forum and am trying to learn how to best use it for developing skills with using linux...
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